Size matters, but only as a ratio

The other day I received yet another breathless email demanding my urgent attention. This one trumpeted the outcome of a recent poll for “the generic Congressional ballot.” Oh, yeah, that ballot. I hope you have mailed yours in by now.

The poll outcome was illustrated with the graphic below.

In any case, the democratic advantage looked pretty impressive until my eye drifted over to the left hand edge, where I noticed that the bars began at 30%. Why start at 30%, rather than zero? TOO MAKE THE DIFFERENCE LOOK BIGGER! Forgive me for shouting but this is such an elementary error, or transparent subterfuge, that I can’t help but be exasperated.

The principle here is that you cannot appreciate the size of the difference between the two bars without knowing the absolute size of each bar. The difference between them is meaningful only as a fraction of the total. This is why a scale extending to zero is called a “ratio scale.”

But lest your eyes glaze over in anticipation of a boring lecture, let me illustrate the idea with a few more graphs. We take the same data shown above, and plot it several times, in each case changing only the starting point of the bars.

Which is “correct?” They all show the same data. The first one reproduces the original figure, starting at 30. But why not start at 40 (second graph) or even 42 (third graph)? That appears to show a gargantuan advantage for the blue party, but only because we can’t see the total lengths of the bars. The correct depiction is the last, starting at zero, which visually presents a much more accurate, and less impressive picture.

When should you use a ratio scale? The question has some depth to it, which we will not fathom today, but it is always the case that percentages should be plotted on a ratio scale.

Reference:

Email from Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

Received: June 22, 2012

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